Song of the Angels


Perhaps the most famous example of this kind is the litany haadereth vehaemunah lehay olamim which is to be found—with a wealth of variations—in the “Greater Hekhaloth” and has been included in the liturgy of the High Holidays. The mediaeval commentators still referred to it as the “Song of the Angels,” and it is probable that it called for the deepest devotion and solemnity on the part of those who prayed. But a formal demand of this kind can hardly have been necessary, for the mighty effect of these incomparably solemn and at the same time infinitely vacuous hymns, i.e. their numinous character, can be witnessed to this day in every synagogue. No wonder that to this day this hymn is recited by many Hasidic Jews every Sabbath among the morning prayers. The following is an approximate translation of the text, which is entirely a medley of praises of God and citations of the attributes that “appertain to Him who lives eternally”:

Excellence and faithfulness—are His who lives forever
Understanding and blessing—are His who lives forever
Grandeur and greatness—are His who lives forever
Cognition and expression—are His who lives forever
Magnificence and majesty—are His who lives forever
Counsel and strength—are His who lives forever
Lustre and brilliance—are His who lives forever
Grace and benevolence—are His who lives forever
Purity and goodness—are His who lives forever
Unity and honor—are His who lives forever
Crown and glory—are His who lives forever
Precept and practice—are His who lives forever
Sovereignty and rule—are His who lives forever
Adornment and permanence—are His who lives forever
Mystery and wisdom—are His who lives forever
Might and meekness—are His who lives forever
Splendor and wonder—are His who lives forever
Righteousness and honor—are His who lives forever
Invocation and holiness—are His who lives forever
Exultation and nobility—are His who lives forever
Song and hymn—are His who lives forever
Praise and glory—are His who lives forever

Gershom Gerhard Scholem, Major trends in Jewish mysticism

Despre Liviu
Crestin, absolvent al unei facultati de teologie (protestanta). Pasionat de Biblie, carte buna, muzica buna, film bun,alte bunatati... si teologie comparata si istoria Bisericii. De orientare teologica Wesley-ana, simpatizant al paleo-ortodoxiei.

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